Living Our Best Lives with Illness

Chronic illness. Two words that represent anything but fun and joy. Rather, those two words are the epitome of pain and suffering.

Those with chronic illnesses know that following a diagnosis, and even before one receives a diagnosis, life can be utter hell. People’s once happy, fun-filled, and busy lives gets turned upside down. Sometimes in the blink of an eye, other times it is a slow, gradual process. Both of which are equally as painful and devastating.

But – we, as chronic illness warriors have two choices.

  1. We can wallow in our pain and feel sorry for ourselves.  Or
  2. We can make the most of our situation and find ways in which we can feel a little better and live our lives to the fullest – WITH illness.

Now, I don’t mean for this to sound harsh. Believe me, I am fully aware that there are varying degrees of chronic illness, and some of us are in excruciating pain every day or bedbound. I was once house bound and spent most of my days in bed. It is not fun. It is crushing. You feel as though you are a sack of potatoes not able to do anything or contribute to society. You wonder, what is the point of my life? 

But I am here to tell you that it may not always be that way. In fact, it probably won’t always be that way. Many chronic illnesses wax and wane in severity. Different treatments, medications, IV fluids, homeopathic options, will allow you to eventually find something that works. Even if it helps just a little, there will be some improvements made at some point in your life. Maybe one day you will be able to get out of bed, leave the house, do some form of exercise, engage in physical therapy, or meet friends at a coffee shop.

This past weekend, I took a road trip with my boyfriend. We went to the mountains to go skiing. Last year was the first time I tried skiing at my local ski club in three years. I was only able to do a couple runs, and I was exhausted, but I was so proud and ecstatic with that accomplishment. My trip this past week was a blast. I was at the ski resort for a total of 4 hours. We had to make lots of stops along the hill, and go in to take a break, but I still had the best time and was satisfied with all I was able to do. I pushed my body no doubt, and of course I payed for it later that day and a few days after the fact. But I did it. I had fun. I enjoyed myself. And for the first time in a long time, I felt normal. Even walking around the town with my walker the day after skiing, I felt alive. Sure I had to use a walker and was the only one wandering the town with an assistive device, but because of that device, I was able to do what everyone else was doing.

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What I really want to get at here, is that we can still have fun. We can still enjoy life. We can make the most of this life and practice gratitude for all that we do have. Sometimes, you don’t always have to be grateful it isn’t worse. We are allowed to have bad days. Believe me, I have my fair share of them with chronic and mental illness. But it does help to remind myself of all my blessings, and that somewhere out there, just miles within my little radius, some people have it worse. There is so much suffering in this world. Every one of us struggles. Every one of us suffers. Every one of us experiences some sort of pain. But we don’t have to let our pain define us. Chronic illness friends: do everything in your power to lead the life you deserve. Try different treatments, work your muscles if you can, do things that YOU ENJOY. Take up knitting or crocheting, draw, paint, get out of the house when your feeling up to it, meet a friend, watch your favorite television shows, take a bubble bath, write, connect with others via social media. Live your best life, because it is so possible. We may not be able to do all we once did, but we can live life to our fullest despite our conditions, and with illness.

Comments

One comment on “Living Our Best Lives with Illness”
  1. Great post and sweet reminders to KEEP LIVING ✨ I love that you went skiing even though it meant a walker the next day. Sometimes I engage in an activity knowing that I will “pay” the next day or the one after that, but it is so worth it. I have allowed my mental state, and sometimes my health, to dictate my life way too often. It’s lovely to let it go, move past it, and enjoy this wild and beautiful life.

    Liked by 1 person

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